Monish Sengupta

MONISH SENGUPTA

Ricardo Rail
United Kingdom

Alternative and innovative approach for train tracking technology

Overview

  • New and innovative approach with significant findings, highlighting the potential for introducing alternative methods to train positioning
  • Reduction of trackside location correction balises, leading to huge reduction in maintenance activity and provide more flexibility in future track design
  • Sensor fusion algorithm and intelligent sensor selection methodology

Abstract

Traditionally a railway is a loosely coupled system in terms of system engineering classification. However, with the introduction of more software based train control systems, railways can be considered in the same category (tightly coupled) as aircraft or space mission control systems, which demands a new approach towards system development and coherent integration. As we move towards CBTC railways or ERTMS L2/L3, we need advanced wheel rail interaction in other words to carry out safe, reliable and accurate measurement of train location, speed and acceleration. Existing railway navigation technique has deployed a balise or equivalent sub-system to correct the uncertainty element of the train location. Typically, a CBTC train is allowed to miss only one balise on the track, after which the Automatic Train Protection system applies the emergency brake to halt the service. This is because the location uncertainty, which grows within the train control system over time and as the train moves, cannot tolerate missing more than a defined number of balises. This not only affects the performance, but also affects the rolling stock wheel profile. Balises contribute a significant amount towards wayside maintenance and studies have shown that balises on the track also form a constraint for future track layout change and change in speed profile. The author has undertaken research at the University College London to investigate the causes of this location uncertainty and consider whether it is possible to identify an effective filter to ascertain, in conjunction with appropriate sensors, more accurate speed, distance and location for a CBTC driven train without too much emphasis on external balises. An appropriate sensor fusion algorithm and intelligent sensor selection methodology can also be deployed to ascertain the railway location and speed measurement at its highest precision. Similar techniques are already in use in aviation, satellite, submarine and other navigation systems. This paper will summarise a new and innovative approach with significant findings, highlighting the potential of introducing alternative methods to train positioning that would enable reduction of trackside location correction balises, leading to huge reduction in maintenance activity and providing more flexibility in future track design.

Biography

Monish Sengupta is a professional physicist and chartered engineer with special interest in CBTC/ERTMS signalling. He is a principal consultant of Ricardo Rail and has completed his research degree at the Centre of Transport Studies, University College of London. He has pursued his career along three broad themes within the field of railway signalling: Automatic train control system for a CBTC railway, main line signalling implementing high speed railways, and legacy signalling design around the UK main line and London underground signalling principles.

 
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